5 Comments

  • kelltic

    Me, I want to be asked before the download. Only my anti-virus gets to download and update without telling me first — I think — Sometimes I just know there are things running that shouldn’t be. Who can say not? And mandatory is one of my most hated words, at least when it applies to me.

    Most of us technically challenged shareware enthusiasts out here aren’t careful enough about what we download (I have a couple of horror stories of my own) so it’s a good thing we have people like you who actually look a little deeper – and translate for us. “mandatory silent updates”, I would have understood, but web-templates ?????, remote configuration file ????? Back to that whole online thing but that isn’t what you were talking about, exactly.

    This is something I sorely miss about my old dial-up connection. When I was offline. I was offline. Period. You can’t get me while I’m not plugged in. Now, I’m suspicious all the time of what might be walking in and out of my doors, er, uh, ports.

    Too bad about the developer rescinding his “invitation”. Guess he got his app kicked, anyway, didn’t he? :)

  • @kelltic

    I am quite confident that you can disconnect any connection as easy as dialup. :)

    Personally I don’t feel that web-based apps are mature enough. One of my core issues with Twitter clients. It is used not because it fits the task perfectly, but because it is easier for developer.

  • Transcontinental

    “I don’t and won’t trust my account to developer that puts his convenience before my security. Would you?”
    Definitely not. Flexibility and details are always proportional to the amount of privacy one is willing to share. There are limits in my opinion. Moreover I believe it is always wise to avoid concentrating all powers on one software. Surfing is one thing, email is another and so on. Big companies dream of being the user’s one and only reference, and small developers as far as they’re concerned tend sometimes, willingly or not, to mistake data and privacy concerns.
    I do say, don’t say everything :)

  • @Transcontinental

    Moreover I believe it is always wise to avoid concentrating all powers on one software. Surfing is one thing, email is another and so on. Big companies dream of being the user’s one and only reference

    That what worries me a bit about Google. You often have no choice except to use multiply services (especially as web publisher).

    And it all stacks on single account with single password. So I am especially sensitive about this one. :)

  • Transcontinental

    There are alternatives to Google services! I mean, Google is nice, Microsoft, Apple and you name it are nice… in some things, less in others. I believe the point is to choose specifically, and not refuse or accept all. I like Google for GMail (though a simple medium when mail is called from Thunderbird), its search engine, the best IMO, and for Google Earth, but the company’s appetite is becoming voracious and privacy concerns notorious. Microsoft makes good OS, but bad browsers and bad search engines… and so on. Look everywhere, so many applications, even Firefox extensions search for… our concerns! Cookies, which were intended to preserve settings, are now systematically on 99% of websites put up on the visitor’s computer: just visit and you are referenced! There is something mad in this business so I dare say and join this belief: be neither cynical, nor paranoid, nor credulous!
    Long live the WWW :)

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